New Techniques to Replace DRAM based Systems

New Techniques to Replace DRAM based Systems

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Researchers from the department of computer engineering at the North Carolina State University have come up with a hardware and software design that would minimize programming errors and enhance the performance of the systems that uses Non-volatile Memory (NVM) technology.

Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) is used by the computers at present. However, DRAM has its own limitations that prevents it from being used by the next generation of systems which are way more advanced. Thus, the next generation systems are more likely to depend on this new NVM technology.

Challenges with NVM Technology 

Next generation systems will depend on the NVM technology for data storage and operations. Researchers working on the technology and on the procedure of shifting said that one of the challenges that is associated with the NVM based systems is the determination of a way to save or log a sizeable amount of memory prior to making any changes to it. With the help of these logs, users can reset the memory in case of system failure. However, right now, logging into a system that is based on the NVM technology requires incorporation of additional codes to the programs, thereby slowing down the performance of the system. It also requires additional operations to overwrite the memory. Reliability of the memory suffers if this procedure of overwriting happens too often.

A system called Proteus has been developed to address this issue. Proteus is a complementary hardware and software model. Another challenge with the MVM technology is how to retrieve an address when the data is given by the system. Some of the programs need those addresses to be modified for security and other reasons and this also reduces the performance of the NVM systems. A technique that is hardware-driven has been developed by the researchers to address this issue.