MIT Targets Home 3D Viewing through Home3D

MIT Targets Home 3D Viewing through Home3D

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3D viewing technology has become a staple in the movie making world due to the superior viewing experience it offers to the viewers. 3D technology provides a convincing sense of depth due to the separation of red and blue color bands and thus offers superior viewing experiences. Commercially used 3D technology works through polarized light and thus requires special glasses for ideal viewing. While this doesn’t present a problem for theater viewing, it can become irritating for home viewers. 

Enabling 3D vision without needing glasses has been one of the enduring technological challenges of our times and has led to several failed innovations. However, the development of automultiscopic displays has made the development of 3D viewing technology convenient and could possibly lead to widespread incorporation of 3D display technology in home multimedia viewing devices. 

MIT Gives You Home3D 

MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has developed Home3D, a video conversion tool that enables viewing of traditional 3D content on home viewing devices such as Xbox and PlayStation consoles, as it requires a graphics processing unit (GPU). Automultiscopic display is a technology that enables the creation of a perfect simulation of objects including humans by capturing them from all angles and presenting the result on a curved screen. While initial development of the technology has been slow, steady advances are likely in the coming years, making the growth of Home3D likely as well. 

While it requires separate GPUs at present, future Home3D could operate simply from a microchip, which could be installed on TVs as well as other media players such as Chromecast. The technology would also allow users to customize the “level” of 3D they desire in a movie, making the technology even more desirable.