Imprinting Biochips becomes More Advanced with New Tool Developed by ASRC

Imprinting Biochips becomes More Advanced with New Tool Developed by ASRC

1024px-Biochip

The Graduate Center of the City University of New York’s Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) has used multidimensional printing to create a possibly more cost-effective and efficient method of developing microarrays or biochips. One of the main applications of biochips could be to analyze and screen research areas that engage biological components, bioterrorism agents, and biological differences related to disease development. Nanoscience Initiative researchers at the ASRC have detailed in a Chem-published paper about how they developed a new biochip printing technique. Basically, the technique has been developed with the combination of photochemical surface and beam-pen lithography reactions and microfluidic techniques.

ASRC Scientists Aim to Reduce their Resolution Down to Single Molecule

The researchers exposed the surface of a biochip to particular organic reagents as part of the new biochip printing method. Afterward, a firmly focused light beam was used to fix the immobilized reagents to the surface of the chip. Scientists could use this process to frequently expose a single chip to different or same factors and later imprint reactions onto other biochip sections. This is expected to result into a biochip that could hold more probes compared to present-day commercial platforms.

Another benefit associated with the new technique is that it could help scientists to dependably print on lipids, metals, glasses, and various other fragile materials. This could be possible even without the need of a cleanroom and on the length measure of biological communications. Lead author, Carlos Carbonell, an ASRC research associate, has said that the technique should be valuable for the entire biological ‘omics’ research field.